Kid on ATV films Bigfoot?

A young Michigan kid filming himself doing doughnuts on his four wheeler may have inadvertently captured Bigfoot lurking in the background. Although neither the name of the ATV rider nor the specific location in state where the video was shot are known at this time, but the footage is fairly intriguing in that it does appear to show some kind of bipedal creature ambling along past a bush behind the unknowing youngster. To that end, according to the brief description that he included with the video, the youngster did not notice the potential Bigfoot until he later got home and watched the footage.

 
After he spotted the possible Sasquatch, he subsequently submitted the video to a YouTube channel which specialized in Bigfoot footage. Included with the video was a brief message from the youngster in which he insisted that the video was not a hoax and shared his suspicion that the oddity was, in fact, a Bigfoot. As often happens with footage of this kind, the reaction has largely been split between those who also believe that it shows a Bigfoot and others who put forward a more skeptical bent.
Of that latter camp, the argument is that the footage is merely a clever hoax, which has some merit in a sense since the camera is ‘conveniently’ pointed more to where the anomaly appears rather than at the ATV. And, one would think that the noise emanating from the four wheeler would be enough to cause a Bigfoot to react with more urgency than in seen is the video. Then again, perhaps the legendary cryptid was trying to sneak away without being noticed. What’s your take on the odd video?

World-renowned Sasquatch researcher dies

Dr. John Bindernagel


A renowned biologist and leading Canadian sasquatch researcher has died.
Dr. John Bindernagel, 76, passed away Jan. 17 after a two year battle with cancer.

A wildlife biologist since 1963, Bindernagel grew up in Ontario and moved to B.C. in 1975, largely due to the high number of reported sasquatch sightings.

Bindernagel worked in the Serengeti in Africa and travelled throughout the Middle East and the Caribbean.

Over the years, he dedicated much of his life to studying the sasquatch in North America.

In 1988, he and his wife found several sasquatch tracks in good condition on Vancouver Island. He made plaster casts from the tracks, which he noted provided the first physical evidence for the existence of the sasquatch.
“I am satisfied that the sasquatch is an extent (or ‘real’) animal, subject to study and examination like any other large mammal,” he wrote. “I remain aware, however, that many people – including scientific colleagues – remain unaware of the information that exists about this species.”

Bindernagel’s son Chris – who lives in Courtenay – said his father was important within the scientific community because he was pushing the boundaries in terms of trying to get acceptability in mainstream science.

“(He had a) really lively curiosity and engagement for what was around him in the natural world. That was really an inspiration to me,” he explained.

“(His frustration) was really the focus of his work in the last few years especially. Not trying to convince the scientific community at large necessarily, but trying to get them to consider the evidence in a proper fashion, to seriously look and see what was available, not just dismiss it out of hand.”

He noted one of the highlights growing up with his dad was his resurgence of interest in the sasquatch during a field trip in Strathcona Park, where he accidentally ran across tracks.

“It was a balance – as I learned more about it, I realized some of this are hoaxes and pranks, but there’s a core of really good evidence that was really convincing to me as well,” said Chris.

“He has a good way of connecting with people and was really interested in people and wanted to share what he was doing, and somehow try to give it some kind of credibility and he felt like he was in that role because he had that background in traditional science.”

Hugh MacKinnon, Comox councillor and former high school administrator, said he first met Bindernagel while working at G.P. Vanier, and brought him in as a speaker to a biology class.

“We really hit it off; he was a real gentleman – just the nicest man. He stuck to his beliefs and was using science to do so. He had time to listen to everyone.”

Bindernagel worked closely with members of First Nations communities on the Island, and MacKinnon noted he “gave credence to traditions and beliefs and encouraged people to speak about it. He made the First Nations communities feel comfortable and validated their beliefs and history.

“John in a nutshell never made you feel out of place.”

Source: Comax Valley Record